The 7 Best Low-Fiber Dog Foods (Stop Those Pooch Toots!)

Dog Food

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April Reid

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low fiber dog foods

Fiber, a nutrient that helps keep your woofer’s digestive system moving, can fend off constipation, stomach upset, and good ol’ butt scooting.

However, a high-fiber diet isn’t necessary for every pup, and in some cases, an excessive amount of fiber can even cause gas and gastrointestinal issues.

Whether your vet has recommended your pup go on a low-fiber diet or you simply want to tackle his endless supply of silent but deadly farts, there are several low-fiber foods on the market from which you can choose. 

We’ll share a few of the best ones below and explain some of the reasons dogs may need low-fiber food! 

Best Overall Low-Fiber Dog Food
Best Low-Fiber Kibble / Dry Dog Food
Best Low-Fiber Canned Dog Food
Best Overall Low-Fiber Dog Food
Best Low-Fiber Kibble / Dry Dog Food
Best Low-Fiber Canned Dog Food

How Much Fiber Is in Dog Foods? What Is Considered “Low Fiber?”

what fiber content is in dog food

There aren’t exactly any official numbers or food regulations regarding what is considered “low fiber.” 

However, your typical kibble has a fiber content of around 4% to 6%. High-fiber foods usually have a fiber content of around 6% to 10%, while low-fiber foods, which we’ll be discussing today, have an average fiber content of 0.5% to 3%.

Do note that these average numbers can vary depending on the type of food. For example, freeze-dried raw foods tend to have a higher fiber content than other foods, so a low-fiber freeze-dried dog food option would be around 3% to 5%.

You also won’t likely find dog food that has a fiber content above 12% (and if you somehow do, be very careful!). When consumed in excessive amounts, fiber can make it hard for your woofer to properly absorb the nutrients he needs to maintain good health

The 7 Best Low-Fiber Dog Foods

dog foods to pick

It’s already a bit tricky to find a suitable high-quality dog kibble for your pooch. Add a low-fiber content requirement into the mix? It goes from challenging to a barking mad task! That’s why we’ve done the hard work for you (and yes, we spent many, many days analyzing dozens of foods and their nutritional content. You’re welcome.) 

The dog foods below are high quality, low in fiber, and have received rave reviews from pup parents. 

1. Nom Nom Dog Food  

Best Overall Low-Fiber Dog Food
Nom Nom
Delivered straight to your door, Nom Nom is a subscription-based kibble that allows you to tailor recipes to your pup’s specific dietary concerns.
Special Discount: New customers can get 50% off!
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About: Even the pickiest of eaters can’t help but nom on this kibble! It’s flavorful, jam packed with nutrients, and can be customized to your pup’s individual needs. Plus, every food recipe has been crafted by board certified veterinary nutritionists.

Features:

  • A range of pre-portioned meals to choose between; many have a fiber content below 2%
  • Tailored to your pup’s dietary needs and health goals 
  • Subscription-based service; food delivered to your door
  • Food is prepared and packed in the USA

Ingredients List

Ground beef, russet potatoes, eggs, carrots, peas, dicalcium phosphate...,

calcium carbonate, salt, fish oil, sunflower oil, vinegar, citric acid (preservative), taurine, choline bitartrate, zinc gluconate, ferrous sulfate, vitamin E supplement, copper gluconate, manganese gluconate, thiamine mononitrate (vitamin B1), selenium yeast, riboflavin (vitamin B2), vitamin B12 supplement, cholecalciferol (source of vitamin D3), potassium iodide.

Pros

  • Formulated by in-house board certified veterinary nutritionists
  • Most dogs love the taste and smell — even picky eaters 
  • Food recipes can be easily adjusted as your pup’s dietary needs change throughout his life

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Has to be refrigerated, which can be inconvenient  

2. Farmina Mini-Breed Dry Dog Food

Best Low-Fiber Kibble
Farmina N&D Ancestral Grain Chicken & Pomegranate

A tasty, chicken-flavored low-fiber kibble that’s designed for medium and large breeds and packed with omega-3 fatty acids.


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About: Finding a low fiber dry dog food can be tricky, but the Farmina Ancestral Grain Chicken & Pomegranate kibble delivers on all fronts.

It’s formulated specifically as a medium and large breed dog food and has a fiber content of just 2.9% The food also boasts an enticing chicken flavor and is packed with omega-3 fatty acids — “healthy fats” that can help soothe aching joints and keep your dog’s coat looking glossy.

Features:

  • A crude fiber content of 2.9%
  • Designed for medium to large dogs
  • Chicken flavor and packed with omega-3 fatty acids 
  • GMO-free formula

Ingredients List

Chicken, Dehydrated Chicken, Whole Spelt, Whole Oats, Chicken Fat...,

Dried Whole Eggs, Fresh Herring, Dehydrated Herring, Dried Beet Pulp, Herring Oil, Dried Carrots, Sun-Cured Alfalfa Meal, Inulin, Fructooligosaccharides, Yeast Extract, Dried Pomegranate, Dried Apple, Dried Spinach, Psyllium Seed Husk, Dried Sweet Orange, Dried Blueberry, Salt, Brewers Dried Yeast, Turmeric, Glucosamine, Chondroitin Sulfate, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Ascorbic Acid, Niacin, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Biotin, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Choline Chloride, Beta-Carotene, Zinc Methionine Hydroxy Analogue Chelate, Manganese Methionine Hydroxy Analogue Chelate, Ferrous Glycine, Copper Methionine Hydroxy Analogue Chelate, Selenium Yeast, Dl-Methionine, Taurine, L-Carnitine, Aloe Vera Gel Concentrate, Green Tea Extract, Rosemary Extract, Mixed Tocopherols (A Preservative).

Pros

  • Absolutely packed with chicken
  • Contains natural sources of glucosamine and chondroitin
  • Omega-3 fatty acids can potentially help with joint pain and improve skin and coat condition

Cons

3. Canidae All Life Stages Wet Dog Food 

Best Low-Fiber Canned
Canidae All Life Stages Wet Dog Food
This low-fiber canned wet dog food can accommodate all life stages and boasts a soft texture that’s gentle on sensitive mouths.
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About: Your woofer is sure to go barking mad over this canned wet dog food from Canidae; it’s flavorful, packed with protein, and boasts a soft texture that’s gentle on sensitive mouths. And with a crude fiber content of 0.5%, it’s one of the lowest fiber food options on the market. 

Features:

  • A crude fiber content of 0.5%
  • Chicken and rice-based recipe
  • Formulated without corn, soy, and wheat 
  • Made in the USA

Ingredients List

Chicken, Chicken Broth, Chicken Liver, Dried Egg Product, Brown Rice...,

Pearled Barley, Potassium Chloride, Salt, Salmon Oil (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Sunflower Oil, Sodium Tripolyphosphate, Agar-agar, Choline Chloride, Canola Oil, Dried Kelp, Dried Cranberries, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Vitamin E Supplement, Zinc Sulfate, Niacin Supplement, Ferrous Sulfate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Zinc Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Vitamin A Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate, Iron Proteinate, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Copper Sulfate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Manganese Proteinate, Potassium Iodide, Riboflavin Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Cobalt Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Rosemary Extract

Pros

  • Pups find the flavor and smell incredibly enticing 
  • Soft texture is gentle on sensitive mouths 
  • Incredibly portable; canned food is long-lasting and can be taken easily on road trips 

Cons

  • Some pup owners reported that the texture isn’t consistent
  • Canned foods like this one are more expensive than kibble 

4. Nulo Freestyle Dried Raw Dog Food

Best Low-Fiber Freeze Dried Raw Dog Food
Nulo Freestyle Dried Raw Dog Food

A protein-rich, freeze-dried recipe that’s low in fiber and high in nutritional value, with extras like probiotics.

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About: While most freeze-dried raw dog foods are usually packed with fiber, Nulo Freestyle Salmon and Turkey Recipe is one of the few exceptions — it has a crude fiber content of just 3%. It’s also high in protein and full of probiotics, which is a plus as dog foods with probiotics may aid digestion and help strengthen your woofer’s immune system.

Features:

  • Crude fiber content of 3%
  • Salmon and turkey recipe
  • Grain-free and packed with probiotics 
  • Made in a USDA-inspected facility 

Ingredients List

Salmon, Turkey Necks, Turkey Liver, Turkey Heart, Strawberries, Pumpkin...,

Ground Turkey Bone, Green Beans, Blueberries, Apples, Carrots, Kale, Parsley, Spinach, Apple Cider Vinegar, Sunflower Oil, Ground Flaxseed, Salt, Dried Kelp, Inulin, Dried Bacillus coagulans Fermentation Product, Potassium Chloride, Salmon Oil, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Mixed Tocopherols (natural preservative), Vitamin E Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Vitamin D3 Supplement

Pros

  • Low fiber content despite being a freeze-dried raw recipe
  • Probiotics help to prevent tummy upset  
  • High protein content is ideal for dogs who lead active lifestyles

Cons

  • Flavor may not win over every pup
  • Fishy odor isn’t exactly pleasant for human noses

5. Diamond Naturals Adult Dry Dog Food 

Best Budget-Friendly Low-Fiber Dog Food
Diamond Naturals
This low-fiber dry dog food is budget-friendly, yet tasty and nutritious.
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About: Low-fiber dog food doesn’t have to break the bank; Diamond Naturals is a budget-friendly, low-fiber dry kibble that’s stuffed full of everything your dog needs, from omega fatty acids to antioxidants. It also doesn’t sacrifice on quality and contains no artificial flavors or colorings.

Features:

  • Crude fiber content of 3.5%
  • Primarily consists of beef meal and rice 
  • Packed with omega fatty acids, antioxidants, and probiotics 
  • Made in the USA with stringent food safety protocols 

Ingredients List

Lamb Meal, Ground White Rice, Cracked Pearled Barley, Grain Sorghum, Egg Product...,

Dried Yeast, Rice Bran, Chicken Fat (Preserved With Mixed Tocopherols), Oatmeal, Dried Beet Pulp, Natural Flavor, Flaxseed, Potassium Chloride, Salt, Dl-Methionine, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Kale, Chia Seed, Pumpkin, Blueberries, Oranges, Quinoa, Dried Kelp, Coconut, Spinach, Carrots, Papaya, Yucca Schidigera Extract, L-Carnitine, Dried Lactobacillus Plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus Subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus Faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Bifidobacterium Animalis Fermentation Product, Vitamin E Supplement, Beta Carotene, Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Potassium Iodide, Thiamine Mononitrate, Manganese Proteinate, Ascorbic Acid, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Niacin, Calcium Pantothenate, Sodium Selenite, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid. Contains A Source Of Live (Viable), Naturally Occurring Microorganisms. The Facility In Which This Food Is Made Also Makes Food That May Contain Other Ingredients.

Pros

  • Budget-friendly, especially considering its high nutritional value 
  • Comes in a range of bag sizes, so you can test the food out before committing to a large quantity 
  • Many owners reported that their pups’ coats look shinier after swapping to this food

Cons

  • Still a fairly high fiber content compared to other low-fiber dry foods
  • Though lamb meal is safe and nutritious, we’d rather see a whole protein at the top of the ingredient list 

6. Blue Buffalo Wilderness Canned Dog Food 

Best Tasting Low-Fiber Dog Food
Blue Buffalo Wilderness Canned Dog Food 

This low-fiber canned dog food is simmered in broth to provide an aroma and taste your pooch will love.

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About: If your pup is a foodie in disguise, he’ll definitely appreciate this Blue Buffalo Wilderness Canned Food — it’s simmered in rich chicken broth to bring out a Michelin-star worthy flavor and smell. The beef and chicken grain-free formula is versatile enough to accommodate pups of all sizes and boasts a fiber content of only 1.5%. 

Features:

  • Crude fiber content of 1.5%
  • Grain-free formula with chicken and beef as primary ingredients 
  • Features several vitamin supplements
  • Can accommodate pups of all sizes 

Ingredients List

Beef, Chicken, Chicken Broth, Chicken Liver, Potatoes, Carrageenan, Flaxseed...,

Guar Gum, Cassia Gum, Potassium Chloride, Salt, Choline Chloride, Magnesium Sulfate, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Vitamin E Supplement, Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Sodium Selenite, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Cobalt Amino Acid Chelate, Niacin Supplement (Vitamin B3), Calcium Pantothenate (Vitamin B5), Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement (Vitamin B2), Biotin (Vitamin B7), Vitamin B12 Supplement, Potassium Iodide, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid (Vitamin B9)

Pros

  • Irresistible taste and smell 
  • High moisture content to ward off dehydration 
  • Specifically formulated with healthy muscle growth in mind; ideal for working dogs 

Cons

  • Canned foods are expensive to feed large dogs
  • Some owners reported that cans were delivered dented 

7. VICTOR Select Grain-Free Dry Dog Food 

Best Low-Fiber Grain-Free Dog Food
VICTOR Select Grain-Free Dry Dog Food 

This low-fiber kibble is grain-free, packed with nutrients, and ideal for sensitive stomachs. 

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About: Does your woofer have a sensitive stomach? Then his bowels will likely appreciate Victor Select Dry Dog Food. It’s a completely grain-free dog food and primarily made from ingredients that don’t commonly trigger adverse reactions in dogs, such as lamb meal and sweet potato. It’s also packed with health supplements, minerals, and vitamins.

Features:

  • Crude fiber content of 3.8% 
  • Grain-free formula with lamb meal and sweet potato 
  • Accommodates dogs of all life stages
  • Made in the USA 

Ingredients List

Lamb Meal, Peas, Sweet Potato, Chicken Fat (preserved with mixed Tocopherols)...,

Garbanzo Beans, Blood Meal Conventionally Dried, Yeast Culture, Menhaden Fish Meal (source of DHA-Docosahexaenoic Acid), Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal, Natural Flavor, Potassium Chloride, Carrot Powder, Tomato Pomace, Salt, Organic Dried Seaweed Meal, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Calcium Stearate, Zinc Methionine Complex, Vitamin E Supplement, DL-Methionine, Iron Amino Acid Complex, Hydrolyzed Yeast, Manganese Amino Acid Complex, Silicon Dioxide, L-Carnitine, Selenium Yeast, Brewers Dried Yeast, Dried Enterococcus Faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus Oryzae Fermentation Extract, Dried Trichoderma Longibrachiatum Fermentation Extract, Dried Bacillus Subtilis Fermentation Extract, Copper Sulfate, Niacin Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Biotin, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Calcium Carbonate, Riboflavin Supplement, Calcium Iodate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate, Vegetable Oil, Rosemary Extract, Green Tea Extract, Spearmint Extract, Inulin, Lecithin, Folic Acid

Pros

  • Ideal for dogs with sensitive stomachs 
  • Formulated specifically to help strengthen the immune system; great for pups recovering from illness 
  • Many owners reported that they saw improvements in their dog’s coat quality and digestion

Cons

  • While it avoids many common allergens, it does still contain chicken fat
  • Not the lowest low fiber dog food option out there 

Reasons a Dog May Require a Low-Fiber Dog Food 

reasons to feed low-fiber dog food

While a low-fiber diet isn’t necessary for every dog, it’s often less taxing on the digestive system and can promote the better absorption of nutrients. Due to this, low-fiber food can help pups recovering from an illness or experiencing certain health conditions, especially those that affect the digestive system. These include:

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): A condition where your pup’s gastrointestinal tract becomes inflamed. Some symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, and unexplained weight loss. Any dog, no matter his age, lineage, or history, has the potential to develop IBD. However, certain breeds are more prone to IBD than others. 
  • Pancreatitis: Pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening condition where your dog’s pancreas becomes inflamed. It can hinder the functioning of the digestive system and cause symptoms such as vomiting, dehydration, lethargy, diarrhea, appetite loss, and a hunched back. 
  • Colitis: Colitis is a condition where the colon and rectum become inflamed. Symptoms may include diarrhea, pain, straining while defecating, frequent bowel movements, and blood in the stool. There are two types of colitis: acute, where the colitis symptoms appear suddenly and last for a few days, and chronic, where symptoms last for longer than 2 weeks. Do note that dietary recommendations for colitis can vary and are best discussed with a vet; some dogs respond well to a high-fiber dog food diet, while others fare better on low-fiber food.
  • Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI): A digestive disorder where your pup’s pancreas isn’t able to produce enough digestive enzymes to properly break down and absorb the food he eats. Symptoms typically include an excessive appetite, weight loss, vomiting, and loose stools. 

If your four-footed woofer often blesses your backyard with several stinky, ahem, “presents” a day, you’ll be pleased to know that a low-fiber diet can help with this too; it can alleviate stool problems like diarrhea and reduce stool frequency. It can even reduce flatulence, which we’re sure many pup parents will also appreciate. 

Benefits and Drawbacks of Low-Fiber Dog Food

pros cons of dog food

Like any diet, a low-fiber diet is better suited to certain pups than others. We’ll discuss them briefly below to give you an idea of what these are. However, always speak to your veterinarian before starting your pup on a new food. 

Benefits of Low-Fiber Dog Food

  • Puts less strain on the digestive system and can help treat health conditions such as IBD 
  • Can help with nutrient absorption; usually contains highly digestible proteins, fats, and carbohydrates
  • May alleviate nausea, constipation, and diarrhea 
  • Can potentially lessen stool volume and frequency 
  • May reduce flatulence 
  • Many dogs find that low-fiber dog food is more palatable; ideal for picky eaters

Drawbacks of Low-Fiber Dog Food

  • Can potentially cause some dogs to experience constipation or diarrhea
  • May promote weight gain, particularly if you have a senior dog who’s less active in his day-to-day life 
  • Can exacerbate anal gland problems 
  • Can potentially contribute to heart disease, particularly if your dog is put on a low-fiber diet without first consulting a vet

Low-Fiber Dog Foods: Things to Look For

best pit bull dog foods

Besides from a low fiber content, there are a few other factors to consider when choosing a new dog food for your woofer:

  • Avoid artificial colors and flavorings. Artificial colors and flavorings serve no real purpose in pet food — high-quality kibble with nutritious ingredients tastes great without artificial flavors and your dog isn’t going to complain about the color (unless he’s Van Gogh disguised in pooch form). Artificial colors and flavorings can also trigger adverse reactions, particularly if your pup has food sensitivities. 
  • Stick to foods manufactured in countries with stringent food safety standards. Yes, opting for kibble made elsewhere may save you a few bucks, but it’ll cost you a lot more in the long run if your dog gets seriously sick. Always stick to dog foods manufactured in countries with strict food safety standards, such as the USA, Canada, New Zealand, or Australia. You should also make sure that the actual ingredients included in the food are sourced from these kinds of countries too.  
  • Check that a whole protein is listed as the first ingredient. While dogs are omnivores, they ultimately need a protein-rich diet to thrive and maintain their energy throughout the day. Due to this, you want to make sure that a whole protein is listed as the first ingredient — dog food ingredients are listed in descending order according to their weight, meaning if a kibble lists a whole protein like chicken as the first ingredient it is mainly made up of chicken. 
  • Check for food sensitivities and allergies. Common allergens include dairy, soy, wheat, beef, and chicken. Always examine the ingredient list carefully if your pup has a particular food intolerance or allergy.
  • Avoid foods that contain obscure meat byproducts. There’s nothing inherently wrong with byproducts like livers, kidneys, and spleens appearing in your dog’s food. In fact, they can actually be a great source of nutrients. However, always avoid food where the meat byproducts aren’t properly described and are instead listed under phrases like “animal meal” or “meat meal.” This is a telltale sign of bad-quality food and it doesn’t give you clear insight into what exactly your dog is consuming.  
  • Check if the dog food contains any beneficial health supplements. Some of the best to look for include probiotics, dog foods with omega fatty acids, and antioxidants, but always take your dog’s needs into account as each supplement offers unique perks. For example, if your pup struggles with skin problems, he’ll likely benefit from omega fatty acids (which can help improve skin and coat condition) more than probiotics. 
Don’t Abruptly Change Dog Foods!

Changing your dog’s kibble to a food tailored to his individual needs comes with plenty of benefits. However, make sure to make the change to a new dog food gradually — a sudden switch can lead to an upset stomach!

Low-Fiber Dog Foods: FAQ 

choosing dog food

Still having trouble deciding whether or not a low-fiber diet is a good choice for your pup? We’ve addressed some commonly asked questions below: 

What dog foods have less fiber?

Dog foods that have less fiber are generally those that cater to a “low-residue diet,” which is essentially a diet that restricts indigestible ingredients as much as possible. Foods with low fiber primarily consist of ingredients such as chicken, dried eggs, peas, and chicken fat, and as we’ve shown above, the food can come in a range of textures and sizes.

Is low fiber good for dogs?

Yes, a low-fiber diet can be good for dogs experiencing stool problems or health issues that affect the digestive system, such as pancreatitis and inflammatory bowel disease. However, a low-fiber diet isn’t suitable for every woofer. Depending on your pup’s health issues and needs, a high-fiber diet may be a better option. Always speak to your veterinarian before making dietary changes. 

Does grain-free dog food have less fiber?

Grain-free dog food typically has less fiber because it cuts out fiber-rich foods like wheat, corn, oats, and rice and instead replaces these with more protein and vegetables. Most grain-free dog foods have a max crude fiber content of 3%.  

What does fiber do for dogs?

Fiber, when consumed at appropriate levels, can have a whole host of benefits, including improved digestive function, better blood sugar levels, and feeling full from fewer calories. Fiber can even help with anal gland problems. However, not all dogs need a fiber-rich diet. And as we’ve discussed above, other woofers actually experience better health benefits on low-fiber kibble. 

A low-fiber diet can potentially help treat a range of gastrointestinal issues in dogs, from IBD to excessive flatulence. Fortunately, low-fiber kibble comes in a range of sizes, textures, and flavors, so you’re sure to find a pawfect option for your four-footed woofer. 

Has your dog indulged in any of the foods mentioned above? Or do you know of some other great low-fiber kibble options? Let us know in the comments below!

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Written by

April Reid

April is a freelance content writer who specializes in animal care. She has owned several pets over the years, and before she began sharing care guides, training tips, and pet product reviews with the online realm, she was a marketing assistant for Portobello Pup -- dog care apparel company. Her role involved interacting with a range of lovable breeds, including puli dogs and chow chows. She has also helped run a stall at the international dog show Crufts. In her spare time, you'll either find her playing tug of war with her pooch, binge-watching animal-themed movies, or birdwatching in the Brecon Beacons.

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