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6 Best Vibrating Dog Collars for Training

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Collars & Harnesses By Ben Team 13 min read September 7, 2021 22 Comments

vibrating dog collars

Dog owners and trainers use a variety of different tools to help teach and train four-footers, including various collars.

Shock collars, which produce a small amount of electricity to help get your dog’s attention or correct a problematic behavior, are one of the most popular styles, but they aren’t the best options for many dogs and their owners.

Some dogs are simply too sensitive for shock collars, and many owners reject them on principle alone. In such cases, collars that vibrate, rather than shock, may provide a worthy option.

Are They Truly More Humane?

Since first publishing this article, K9 of Mine has changed its stance on using aversive tools like vibrating collars. While they may be considered mild compared to shock collars, vibrating collars are still somewhat controversial.

When it comes down to it, they are still aversive tools that use fear and discomfort to punish your dog, which can have some serious repercussions and unwanted fallout.

Make sure you’ve explored all alternatives before resorting to a vibrating dog collar and be sure to brush up on dog body language to get a better idea of how your dog is responding to the stimulus. You don’t want to see increased signs of anxiety!

Quick Picks: Best Vibrating Dog Collars

  • Dog Care Training Collar [Best Overall] — There’s little doubt that this is the best option for owners looking for an effective, easy to use, and highly rated training collar. You can even use this model to control up to nine collars at once.
  • Paws Furlosophy No-Shock Collar [Best No-Shock Option] — This is a high-quality, affordable training collar that uses sound, light, and vibration (rather than electric shocks) to help address behavioral issues.
  • Pop View Dog Collar [Best Bark-Stopping Option] — If you need a collar that will help curb your dog’s nuisance barking, the Pop View Collar is easily the best choice on the market. Its progressive deterrent system, has proven very helpful for most owners who tried it.

How Do Vibrating Collars Work?

There are a couple of different types of vibrating collars, but they all work in essentially the same manner. The collars typically attach via a rubber or fabric collar, which connects with a buckle, a set of snaps, or Velcro.

The vibrating module attaches to the collar and usually features a pair of rubber or metal prongs, which contact your dog’s neck.

Many vibrating collars can also be used to trigger an audible tone or a static shock, but others only feature a vibration mode. A few units can be triggered by a hand-held remote, but other models (primarily those of the “anti-barking” variety) work automatically when they sense your dog trying to vocalize.

Note that some trainers contend that vibrating collars should only be used to get your dog’s attention, rather than to issue corrections. However, other trainers take the opposite stance and encourage their use as correction tools.

Just be sure to learn as much as you can about the devices, and try to make the best choice for you and your pooch. If you are currently working with a trainer, it is probably wisest to embrace the view he or she takes.

6 Best Vibrating Dog Collars

The following six vibrating training collars represent the best options available, and you should be able to find one that will work well for you and your pup among them.

1. Dog Care Training Collar

About: The Dog Care Training Collar is a multi-function, user-operated training tool that can be used with up to nine dogs at the same time.

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

Features: The Dog Care Training Collar gives owners the chance to use three different types of stimulation to help train their dog. You can even adjust the strength of the shock provided, as this product has a 0-99 sensitivity level control.

This kit comes with one collar and an easy-to-carry hand-held remote control. The remote control also has a very helpful keypad security lock, so you don’t have to worry about accidentally sending a correction while the remote is bouncing around in your pocket.

The Dog Care Training Collar has a range of 330 yards, and it is suitable for dogs weighing between 15 and 100 pounds.

Correction Options: Beep, Vibration, and Shock

PROS

Most owners who tried the Dog Care Training Collar raved about it. Owners explained that it worked for helping to address a wide variety of behavioral issues, and that it worked exactly as well as they’d hoped. The product’s reasonable price tag also elicited a ton of praise.

CONS

While most owners appeared to like the Dog Care Training Collar, a few reported problems with the shock setting — it didn’t seem to work consistently. A few other owners mentioned sizing issues, and it seems that this collar is too large for smaller dogs.

2. Pop View Dog Collar

About: The Pop View Dog Collar is an automatic training collar, designed to help put an end to your dog’s nuisance barking.

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

Features: The Pop View Dog Collar is bark-stopping collar that is designed to work automatically — you don’t need to use a remote control at all. This vibrating collar simply senses when your dog barks, and then triggers an escalating series of corrections until the barking stops.

This collar also includes a very helpful sensitivity function, which allows you to adjust the level of barking required to trigger a correction. For safety’s sake, this collar features reflective stitching, to help keep your pooch visible in dim light.

The Pop View Collar is suitable for dogs between 11 and 120 pounds (neck sizes 7 to 21 inches), and it is backed by the manufacture’s 90-day guarantee.

Correction Options: Sound and Vibration

PROS

Many owners who tried the Pop View Dog Collar were surprised at how effective the tool was. The majority of owners rated it very highly, and several also mentioned that it operated in a very consistent fashion. Several owners also reported that it was very easy to set up and use.

CONS

While most owners found the Pop View Collar effectively stopped their dog’s nuisance barking, some owners explained that it did not solve the problem. A few owners also complained that they received defective units, but that’s a common problem with most electronic consumer goods.

3. SportDOG Rechargeable Training Collar

About: The SportDOG Training Collar is a flexible training tool that is effective at long distances and comes with rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

Features: The SportDog Training Collar is a user-operated training tool designed to work with up to three dogs at a time (additional collars sold separately). This collar has a 500-yard range, and it gives owners 21 different levels of stimulation to choose from.

This collar is waterproof (you can even submerge it up to 25 feet), and it comes with a battery life indicator light, so you’ll never be surprised by a dead battery. The batteries charge very quickly too — generally in less than two hours.

The SportDog Training Collar is backed by a one-year warranty, and it is suitable for dogs over 8 pounds (neck size 5 to 22 inches).

Correction Options: Vibration, Beep, and Static Stimulation

PROS

Most owners seemed to be happy with the SportDog Training Collar. Several reported that it was extremely consistent, easy to use, and — most importantly — effective. In fact, many owners were surprised at how quickly they were able to fix their dog’s problematic behaviors. A few owners also praised the fact that the remote control is small, and therefore convenient to carry.

CONS

Most complaints about the SportDog Training Collar revolved around durability issues. Additionally, a few owners felt that the shock settings were too strong for small or timid dogs. There were also a few complaints about charging the device, as it seems difficult to achieve a good connection.

4. Paws Furlosophy No-Shock Dog Collar

About: The Paws Furlosophy No-Shock Dog Collar is a user-operated training device that boasts one of the longest ranges of any vibrating collar on the market.

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

Features: The Paws Furlosophy No-Shock Collar is a multi-function training collar. It provides 16 different levels of stimulation, it works at distances of up to 650 yards, and you can use it to control two collars at the same time. It comes with a belt clip and neck strap for carrying convenience, and features an LED battery life display.

This training collar is designed to be supremely waterproof, as it not only has an IPX7 rating but a durable ABS shell and a tightly sealed rubber plug that protects the charging port.

The Paws Furlosophy Collar is backed by the manufacturer’s 100% satisfaction guarantee, and it is appropriate for all dogs over 6 months of age and between 22 and 100 pounds.

Correction Options: Tone, Vibration, and Light

PROS

The overwhelming majority of owners who tried the Paws Furlosophy Collar were very happy with their purchase. It proved very effective for most owners who tried it, and many pet parents were happy that the collar worked without the need for a shock function.

CONS

There weren’t many negative reviews for the Paws Furlosophy Collar at all. Some owners were unhappy with the directions provided, but we couldn’t find any other consistent complaints.

5. GoodBoy Remote Dog Collar

About: The GoodBoy Remote Dog Collar provides owners with the chance to activate three different types of corrections, and it is designed to fit easily in your pocket for maximum convenience.

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

Features: The GoodBoy Remote Dog Collar gives you the chance to trigger three different types of correction, and you can adjust the stimulation level for the vibration and shock settings to any of nine different settings. It has an effective range of approximately 1,000 feet.

The GoodBoy Remote Collar features a long-life battery that lasts up to 16 hours between charges (you can recharge the batteries via the included power pack or by plugging it into a USB port). The remote control included with the unit can operate two collars at once, and pairing collars to the remote is as easy as pushing a button.

This collar is appropriate for dogs with necks measuring between 8.5 and 22 inches. However, the manufacturer recommends using only sound or vibration for pets less than 15 pounds.

Correction Options: Sound, Vibration, and Shock

PROS

By and large, most owners seemed to like the GoodBoy Remote Training Collar. Several owners mentioned that it was very effective, and in many cases, owners didn’t even need to use the shock function to obtain good results. Many owners were also happy with the collar’s affordable price tag.

CONS

Several owners reported that the shock function didn’t seem to have any effect on their dog at all, and others complained that the shock didn’t operate consistently. A few owners also reported durability and charging problems, but these types of complaints weren’t very common.

6. DogRook No Bark Collar

About: The DogRook No Bark Collar automatically detects your dog’s barking and begins vibrating to get them to stop. The unit emits an audible “warning” tone after your dog’s first and second bark; thereafter it adds a vibrating correction.

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

Features: The DogRook No Bark Collar comes with a lot of neat features and benefits, including reflective stripes to improve your dog’s visibility in low light, and two different sized probe sets, which help you attain a good fit for your pooch. The DogRook Collar also comes with two different face plates (one blue, one orange).

Unlike some other automatic dog collars, the DogRook is designed to distinguish between your dog’s barks and other sounds. The collar is powered by two included 6-volt batteries, and a second set of batteries comes with your purchase. A free training eBook also comes with your purchase.

This collar is designed for dogs between 11 and 100 pounds, and it is 100% water resistant.

Correction Options: Vibration and Shock

PROS

Most owners who tried the DogRook No Bark Collar were happy with the product and raved about its efficacy. Words like “amazing,” “outstanding,” and “great,” appeared again and again in customer reviews. This training collar may only be designed to alter one behavior (nuisance barking), but it appears to do that incredibly well.

CONS

Complaints about the DogRook No Bark Collar were very rare. A few owners of very small dogs noted problems regarding the fit. A few also noted that the unit was too sensitive and would vibrate in response to loud noises in the environment.

Our Recommendation: The Dog Care Training Collar

Honestly, it was pretty easy for us to identify the best vibrating training collar available to owners. The Dog Care Training Collar provides just about every feature and capability owners could want, it has a generous range, and you can use it to control up to nine dogs at a time.

Most owners who tried the collar were very happy with their choice, explaining that it was not only effective, but affordable and easy to use as well.

The Pros and Cons of Vibrating Collars

Vibrating collars are pretty nifty training devices, but like any other tool, they have both strengths and weaknesses. Some of the pros and cons of these devices include:

PROS

  • Completely harmless stimulation, which will not hurt your dog in any way, shape, or form
  • They produce a distinct stimulus, which is effective for correcting your dog
  • They won’t startle many dogs as much as shock collars will

CONS

  • Vibrating collars are sometimes more expensive than other options
  • The bulk and weight of the collar may be inappropriate for very small dogs
  • They may not provide sufficient stimulation to stop dogs during a “SQUIRREL!” moment
dog collar vibrating

Vibrating Collars for Deaf Dogs: Helping Your Hearing-Impaired Hound

You can also use vibrating collars to help train and manage hearing-impaired dogs. Deaf pups still want to get the chance to run, jump and play, but because they can’t hear, it can be difficult to recall them or capture their attention when off leash. This is obviously a problem, but vibrating collars are a great solution.

With a vibrating collar, you can train your dog to make eye contact with you anytime you activate the unit. From this point, you can use hand-signals and body language to communicate with your pup, whose eyes should now be locked on you.

Other Types of Training Collars

Vibrating collars are not the only type of training collar available, and owners have several different options from which they can choose.

Each type has its proponents and detractors and offers different benefits and drawbacks, so it is important to consider your options carefully before making a selection.

Some of the most popular training collar alternatives include:

Manual Correction Collars

This includes things like chain collars, slip leads, martingales, and prong collars. Each of these styles is built slightly differently, but they all work in the same general way: You jerk the leash sharply, which causes the collar to cinch closed and then release very quickly.

Coastal Pet Products DCP553020 20-Inch Titan Heavy Chain Dog Training Choke/Collar with 3mm Link, Chrome

Some believe that this simulates the way in which dogs correct each other (throat biting), while others think it is simply unpleasant, and therefore prompts the dog to stop the undesirable behavior.

Regardless of the psychological reason these types of collars work, they are often quite effective when used by an owner trained in their proper use.

We’ve written extensively about these types of collars, so be sure to take a gander at our training collar article if you are interested in them.

Citronella Spray Collars

Citronella dog collars are another type of training collar that many owners like to use.

PetSafe Remote Spray Trainer, Training Collar and Remote for Dogs 8 lb. and Up, Water Resistant with Citronella Spray

Instead of delivering a small shock or squeezing your dog’s neck, a citronella spray collar delivers a whiff of citronella spray toward your dog’s face when he barks, yanks on the leash or displays some other undesirable behavior.

Citronella collars are generally assumed to be gentler than many other corrective collars, but they aren’t quite as universally effective, either. In fact, some dogs learn to appreciate the spray and begin trying to deliberately trigger the device.

Shock Collars

Shock collars deliver a mild shock to your dog’s neck area when triggered automatically or when you press a button on a remote control.

Petrainer PET998DRB1 Dog Training Collar Rechargeable and Rainproof 330 yd Remote Dog Training Collar with Beep, Vibra and Static Electronic Collar

Older than citronella or vibrating collars, these have been used by owners and trainers for years, but some are understandably reticent to shock their dog on a repeat basis.

Most of these collars can be adjusted to deliver shocks of varying intensities, which will help you get your dog’s attention without causing undue stress. When used correctly, they can be very effective and yield positive results.

Note that some manufacturers and reviewers try to draw a distinction between static discharges and electricity, but the difference isn’t very meaningful in this context. Lightning, for example, is caused by a static discharge.

Do you use a vibrating collar for your dog? How has it worked out for you? Has it proved as effective as you’d hoped? We’d love to hear about your experiences in the comments below.

Dealing with a barky pup? Make sure to also read out articles on:

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Written by

Ben Team

Ben is the senior content editor for K9 of Mine and has spent most of his adult life working as a wildlife educator and animal-care professional. Ben’s had the chance to work with hundreds of different species, but his favorite animals have always been dogs. He currently lives in Atlanta, GA with his spoiled-rotten Rottweiler named J.B. Chances are, she’s currently giving him the eyes and begging to go to the park.

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22 Comments

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Angel

Hi, I thought the article was very informative. I don’t have a baking issue with my dog but she chews on everything! We have a lot of bones and chew toys for her. I was wondering if the remote controlled vibration collar might be an option when she starts chewing on what she’s not supposed to. Thanks!

Reply
Ben Team

Glad you liked the article, Angel.

But honestly, there are probably better ways to put an end to your dog’s destructive chewing habit.
For starters, understand that dogs need to chew — it’s up to us to give them something safe and appropriate to chew.

Also, you may want to give some thought to whether she’s exhibiting typical dog chewing behavior, or if she is exhibiting signs of underlying anxiety.
At any rate, best of luck!

Reply
janesmith

In other words, pain and punishment. Maybe the author needs to do some actual research in to the harmful effects of punishment collars before suggesting people “jerk the leash sharply” and seriously injure their dog.

Reply
Ben Team

Hey, Jane.
We’ve changed our view on aversive training tools over time, but the main thrust of this article is about vibrating collars, which are pretty gentle in comparison to some other tools.
And the quoted passage is only a description of how they work.
Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Reply
Troy

“Manual Correction Collars…. You jerk the leash sharply, which causes the collar to cinch closed and then release very quickly.”

In other words, pain and punishment. Maybe the author needs to do some actual research in to the harmful effects of punishment collars before suggesting people “jerk the leash sharply” and seriously injure their dog.

Reply
Ben Team

Hey there, Troy.

I appreciate the fact that you’re not a fan of manual correction collars. We tend to advocate for training and dog management methods that utilize positive reinforcement rather than aversive techniques, while also understanding that each owner has to decide the best approach for his or her dog.

That said:

1) All I did was describe how they’re used.
2) The entire point of this article is to identify some of the best vibrating collars on the market.

But we appreciate you checking out the site!

Reply
Diane Trepanier

Good Morning,
I have had kennel and clipping shops sense 1962 with Mom. As I have seen many people are not aware that Citronella in any form can and does cause seizures in pets . I have found one customer with a new Pom. that had a seizure do to a bath in Citrus Shampoo, which I never used again in my shop.
Then I had a customer who had a dog that had not had a seizure for over two years . He started a grand mall seizure for over an hour, I ask him if he used any citrus in the house, he had cleaned the house with a bottle of citrus cleaner and had to clean the whole house again, leaving the dog with friends.
I also had a customer with a dog that only had seizures when they went to Florida in the winter. she had an Orange tree in the yard and the dog would play with them and that was fenced in so he could not get them.
I would NOT RECOMEND your spray collars to anyone . You may want to consider this kind of spray……Thank You for your comment section Diane in Maine

Reply
Ben Team

Hey, Diane.
You’re right that some citrus extracts can cause illness in dogs, but citronella oils are not derived from citrus plants — they come from lemongrass (Cymbopogon).
Thanks for reading!

Reply
Marjorie

Hi! I loved this article, very informative for me as our Dane has a barking problem. I did not know there were so many options out there for this. I love the idea of remote control, so if he is warning us, he can, but barking excessively has got to stop.
Thank you for your research on this, it really helped me. 🙂

Reply
Lablover

I thought the article was great. I our first lap dog and he likes to play “catch me if you can”. But he is so fast and I am so old!! He only weighs 13lbs so I am not interested in shocking him. I like the idea of a vibration. I will try one of the recommendations. Thank you!!

Reply
Sandra Armstrong

Is pro view vibrating collar waterproof

Reply
Ben Team

Hey, Sandra. It appears to be water resistant, but not waterproof.
You’d probably want to remove it before bathing your pupper or giving him a bath.
Best of luck!

Reply
Mirage Pet Products

Thank you for sharing. The post is very informative.
Only the con with the vibrating collar is that they’re on the expensive side.

Reply
Robyn Whod

They’re expensive because they are shock collars!

Reply
Dan

So, your click bait article for no shock dog collars features one collar that’s only valuable to someone with two dogs, one that DOES shock the dog, and three that are only for barking. You are absolute morons and should be sent to the Philippines and caned.

Reply
Ben Team

Click bait, Dan? Really?

Sorry you didn’t find the article helpful, but each of those collars offers a vibration-based correction mode. Some also provide users with the option to deliver a shock, but you don’t have to use those settings if you don’t want to. At any rate, thanks for reading.

Reply
Robyn Whod

I could not have said it better myself. This article is total garbage!

Reply
Meg Marrs

Well Robyn, we’ve done the research and these are your only options. All these units provide a vibration-only mode, with the Paws Furlosophy being totally shock-free. We can’t change how the products work, sorry. If you find an alternative that meets your standards, do let us know.

Reply
Patrick

Hi Ben,
Congrats for your article.
As you mentioned above, “The bulk and weight of the collar may be inappropriate for very small dogs.”, I have a deaf dachshund dapple and she is small.
Considering that, wich vibrating collar is more indicated to use, because the size and weight of all collars that I saw until now are big and heavy for her size.
Thanks for your attention.
Regards

Reply
Mary

Does the iReady train ning collar allow for it to be used as a traditional bark collar that goes off automatically when no one is home and the dog barks?
Thank you.
Mary

Reply
Meg Marrs

Sorry, not sure which collar you are referring to.

Reply
Erica

This was an awesome and very helpful article. It’s helped me choose the right collar for me and my dog. Thanks!!

Reply

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