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5 Best Dog Food For Huskies: Fuel for Winter Wanderers!

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Dog Food By Ben Team 12 min read September 25, 2020 5 Comments

best dog food for huskies

There’s nothing quite like watching a Siberian husky run across a snow-covered field. Their grace, athleticism and handsome aesthetics make them one of the world’s most popular breeds!

Literally born to run, these dogs were bred to drag sleds across the snow and ice of eastern Siberia.

This has equipped the dogs with a nearly inexhaustible reserve of energy, which demands a steady supply of high-quality, nutritious dog food.

Best Dog Food For Huskies: Quick Picks

  • SportDogFood Canine Athlete Formula [Most Protein] Protein-packed formula which contains flaxseed oil and fortified with glucosamine and chondroitin to support muscle repair and the joint health of your husky.
  • Taste of the Wild Dry Dog Food [Best Value]. A meaty recipe featuring bison, venison, lamb, and chicken as the first ingredients, along lwith a variety of fruits and vegetables.
  • Orijen Regional Red Adult Dog Food [Most Meat-Packed Recipe]. This kibble is made with a variety of fresh red meats and fish, with angus beef, fresh wild boar, lamb, and liver as the first ingredients. Kibble is also coated with probiotics to enhance digestibility.
  • Blue Buffalo Life Protection Adult Dog Food [Most Affordable]. A reasonably-priced high-quality dog food made with premium meats, vegetables, and whole grains (like brown rice and barley) with no artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives.

Continue reading for more in-depth reviews

The Finer Points of Husky Nutrition

Pound for pound, huskies may be the most energetic breed the world has ever seen. Huskies need lots of exercise to keep them healthy and emotionally satisfied. Husky owners are no doubt familiar with their high-energy lifestyle, as these dogs seem to be in perpetual motion.

This constant activity requires plenty of high-performance fuel, so be sure to feed your husky enough calories. Just remember that inactive or under-exercised huskies can quickly become overweight, so don’t overdo it.

A 50-pound husky needs about 1,000 to 1,200 Calories per day, although this can vary greatly depending on your pup’s activity level.

husky dog foodHusky Health Concerns

Huskies are prone to developing a few different medical conditions that can be influenced by their food.

  • Huskies frequently develop high blood pressure, so it is wise to limit the amount of saturated fats in their diet. Left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to strokes, heart attacks and many other dangerous conditions.
  • Zinc-responsive dermatosis is a skin disease that is particularly common in huskies. This typically occurs when huskies are denied sufficient levels of zinc in their food, so be sure to check the zinc content of any food you intend to purchase.
  • Arthritis is quite common in older Siberian huskies, so it makes sense to select dog foods that have been fortified with joint-health-improving supplements, such as chondroitin or glucosamine.

How to Please Picky Pooches: Spicing Up A Boring Meal

Finicky eaters pop up in every breed’s gene pool, but picky pooches appear to occur with surprising regularity in the husky bloodline. Smart owners will make sure to select foods that are especially delicious to reduce the chances that their choosy canines will refuse their new food.

Just like humans, dogs are individuals, and your husky may decide that he cannot stand a food most other dogs love (like those crazy friends of yours who don’t like peanut butter). However, there are a few tricks you can employ to help convince your pup to eat foods he normally rejects. Some pro doggy eating hacks include:

  • Stir some warm water in with the food. This will help alter the texture and distribute the food’s scent particles in the air, which may get your dog’s mouth watering.
  • If warm water doesn’t get your dog’s mouth salivating, try adding a very small amount of a raw fat, such as olive oil, peanut oil or vegetable oil, to increase the palatability of the food. Fats are very high in calories (fats contain more calories per gram than proteins or carbohydrates – there’s a reason Mother Nature stores energy in the form of fat), so be sure to avoid over-doing it.
  • Mix a small amount of wet food in with your dog’s kibble. Most huskies that turn their noses up at dry kibble will devour a quality wet food, so try to mix in a little of the wet stuff to spark his interest. As with added fats, it is important to be mindful of the calories you are adding to his food.
  • Many husky owners report that their dogs quickly become “bored” when offered the same food on a day-in-day-out basis. One potential solution to this problem is to mix in a healthy treat, which you can rotate on a weekly basis. For example, you may add some peas to your dog’s kibble one week, and then switch to diced carrots or shredded chicken, the next.
dog food for huskies reviews

Distinguishing Good Dog Foods vs Bad For Huskies

Although many pet parents struggle when trying to compare one dog food to another, there are several ways to pick a good dog food for your husky. Consider the following factors, no matter what type of food you decide to offer:

  • Select foods made without artificial flavors, colors or preservatives. This will help reduce the chances that your husky will develop a food allergy to any of these substances.
  • While there is nothing inherently wrong with high-quality animal by-products or meat-meals, it is a good idea to select a food that lists a whole, easily identifiable protein source as the first ingredient.
  • Look for foods that contain added omega-fatty acids to keep your pup’s coat looking great (which is especially important for huskies, given their luxurious fur).
  • Always select foods that are manufactured in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Western Europe or the United States, so you know it was produced in a country with stringent food quality standards.
  • Avoid foods that contain unidentified by-products or meat-meals. There is nothing wrong with a manufacturer adding high-quality chicken by product (for example) to a food to help increase its protein content, but you need to know what animal species was used in the creation of the food.

How Often Should I Feed My Husky?

To keep your husky’s metabolism humming along at a relatively constant rate, try to split up his meals and feed him throughout the day. Twice-daily feeding will suffice, but it is preferable to feed your husky three times a day if possible.

Additionally, by spreading your dog’s meals throughout the day, you reduce the amount of food that remains in his stomach at one time. This will not only keep your husky feeling better and lighter on his feet, it will help provide a small amount of protection against bloat – a deadly condition that can strike suddenly.

Bloat occurs when a dog’s stomach becomes twisted on its axis. Once it has spun around, the weight of the food and stomach acid can make it get stuck in this position. This cuts off the blood flow to portions of the digestive tract and keeps gases from escaping. If not treated promptly, bloat can become fatal in a matter of hours.

This is of particular concern with huskies, given their predilection for bounding out the door (or around the house) at full speed at the slightest provocation. Because excessive post-meal activity is thought to be a contributing factor to bloat, it makes sense to limit the amount of food provided to these uber-active dogs at one time.

husky dog food brands

5 Best Dog Foods for Huskies: Reviews

Some of the best foods for huskies include the following:

1. SportDogFood Canine Athlete Formula Dog Food

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

SportDogFood Canine Athlete Formula Dog Food

SportDogFood Canine Athlete Formula

Specifically formulated for active dogs

Protein-packed formula fortified with glucosamine and chondroitin for muscle repair and joint health.

AboutSportDogFood Canine Athlete Formula Dog Food is specially formulated for active dogs, such as those with an official job (such as K9 dogs), or those involved in agility trials.

Features:

  • Fortified with glucosamine and chondroitin to support muscle repair and joint health
  • Made and sourced in the USA
  • Contains flaxseed oil, which is a source of omega fatty acids

PROS

Dogs love the protein-packed taste of SportDogFood Canine Athlete Formula, and the variety of different protein sources provide your dog with a diverse array of micronutrients.

CONS

Chicken meal is the first listed ingredient. However, this is a relatively minor tradeoff for such an economically priced food.

Ingredients List

Chicken Meal, Whole Brown Rice, Whole Ground Sorghum, Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Menhaden Fish Meal...,

Chicken Liver, Whole Ground Flaxseed Meal, Salmon Oil, Chondroitin, Glucosamine Hydrochloride, Calcium Proteinate, Choline Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Brewer Yeast, Dried Beet Pomace, Vitamin E Supplement, Iron Proteinate, Inulin, Ascorbic Acid, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Iron Proteinate, Niacin Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Vitamin A Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Menadione Nicotinamide Bisulte, Beta Carotene, Folic Acid, Selenium, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Rosemary Extract.

2. Taste of the Wild Dry Dog Food

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

Taste of the Wild Dry Dog Food

Taste of the Wild Dry Dog Food

Great choice for picky huskies

High-quality, nutrient-rich dog food made with a variety of several meaty animal proteins.

About: Taste of the Wild Dry Dog Food is a high-quality dog food that’s a solid option for huskies and is available at a very reasonable price.

Features

  • Made with a variety of fruits and vegetables, which provide important vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidants
  • Fortified with Omega fatty acids to keep your husky’s coat looking its best
  • Manufactured in the USA

PROS

Taste of the Wild is a meat-heavy dog food that features a variety of helpful additives to keep your dog healthy and happy for years to come. Additionally, dogs usually find the meaty taste delicious, making this a great choice for picky huskies.

CONS

Although Taste of the Wild is primarily comprised of novel proteins, which are unlikely to trigger any potential food allergies, it contains chicken meal and egg products, which compromises its value for dogs allergic to poultry.

Ingredients List

Bison, venison, lamb meal, chicken meal, egg product...,

sweat potatoes, peas, potatoes, canola oil, roasted bison, roasted venison, natural flavor, tomato pomace, ocean fish meal, choline chloride, dried chicory root, tomatoes, blueberries, raspberries, yucca schidigera extract, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Saccharomyces cerevesiae fermentation solubles, dried Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract, vitamin E supplement, iron proteinate, zinc proteinate, copper proteinate, ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium iodide, thiamine mononitrate (vitamin B1), manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, ascorbic acid, vitamin A supplement, biotin, calcium pantothenate, manganese sulfate, sodium selenite, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), vitamin B12 supplement, riboflavin (vitamin B2), vitamin D supplement, folic acid.

3. Wild Calling Western Plains Stampede

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Wild Calling Western Plains Stampede

Wild Calling Western Plains Stampede

Beef-heavy kibble that’s grain-free

Delicious beef-based dog food which is corn, soy, and wheat-free while containing probiotics, and omega fatty acids for digestive health.

About: Wild Calling Western Plains Stampede is a meat-heavy, plant-based kibble made without many common food allergens that could potentially cause your husky to develop skin conditions.

Features

  • Beef is the primary ingredient in this beef-based dog food.
  • Fortified with pro-biotics and omega fatty acids to support digestive health and a beautiful coat
  • Contains no corn, soy, wheat, gluten or yeast
  • 75% of the protein in this food comes from animal-based sources

PROS

Most dogs – even picky ones – find Wild Calling Western Plains Stampede delicious, which can be helpful with huskies who are commonly finicky eaters.

CONS

Although Wild Calling Western Plains Stampede is free of many grains that cause food allergies, its primary protein source is beef, which is a reasonably common allergen.

Ingredients List

Beef, Sweet Potato, Lentils, Tapioca, Chicken Fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid)...,

Dried Peas, Natural Flavor, Flaxseed, Beef Liver, Potassium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Dried Seaweed Meal, Dried Cranberries, Dried Blueberries, Dried Pumpkin, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Calcium Carbonate, Zinc Proteinate, Salt, Vitamin E Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Ferrous Sulfate, Niacin, Copper Proteinate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Calcium Iodate, Folic Acid.

4. Orijen Regional Red Adult Dog Food

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

Orijen Regional Red Adult Dog Food

Orijen Regional Red Adult Dog Food

Freshly sourced, regionally-native ingredients

This probiotics-coated kibble is made with a variety of fresh free-range red meats and fish to satisfy your husky’s hunger.

About: Orijen Regional Red Adult Dog Food is made with a variety of free-range red meats and fish, which are sure to satisfy your husky’s hunger and his taste buds.

Features

  • Freshly sourced, regionally native ingredients
  • Manufactured in Canada
  • Kibble is coated in pro-biotics after cooking to enhance digestibility

PROS

If you are looking for a dog food made with a variety of different meats, no grains, and several different fruits and vegetables, Orijen Regional Red may be the food for you.

CONS

Premium ingredients come at premium prices, but most customers report that they have been very satisfied with the value of this food.

Ingredients List

Boned fresh Angus beef, fresh wild boar meat, fresh lamb, liver fresh beef, bone (5%)...,

fresh pork liver, fresh herring, fresh liver, dried beef, fresh bovine meat, fat, dried herring, dried herring, red lentils, chick peas, peas, yellow peas, green lentils, herring, pea fiber, yams, sun dried alfalfa, pumpkin, buttery squash, spinach, carrots, red apples, Bartlett pears, cranberries, blueberries, kelp, licorice root, angelica root, fenugreek, marigold flowers, sweet fennel, peppermint leaf, chamomile, dandelion, summer four barley, and rosemary.

5. Blue Buffalo Life Protection Adult Dog Food

This is a sponsored placement, in which an advertiser pays a fee to be featured in this article. Learn more

Blue Buffalo Life Protection Adult Dog Food

Blue Buffalo Life Protection Lamb & Brown Rice

Affordable grain-inclusive kibble with plenty of meat

Made with premium meats like lamb and turkey, this kibble has no artificial colors, flavors or preservatives.

About: Blue Buffalo Life Protection Adult Dog Food is a reasonably priced, high-quality dog food that delivers a lot of value for your dog-food dollar.

Features

  • Made in the USA
  • Features no corn, soy or wheat products
  • Made without any artificial colors, flavors or preservatives
  • Made with premium meats, vegetables and whole grains

PROS

Blue Buffalo Life Protection Adult Dog Food is a great choice for owners who want a high-quality dog food, containing premium ingredients and added omega-fatty acids, without breaking the bank.

CONS

Most owners report that their dogs love the taste of Blue Buffalo, but there are a few scattered reports of dogs turning their noses up at the food. However, this is likely to be the case with any commercially produced food on the market.

Ingredients List

Deboned Lamb, Oatmeal, Whole Ground Barley, Turkey Meal, Whole Ground Brown Rice...,

Peas, Tomato Pomace (source of Lycopene), Flaxseed (source of Omega 3 and 6 Fatty Acids), Natural Flavor, Canola Oil (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Alfalfa Meal, Whole Potatoes, Sunflower Oil (source of Omega 6 Fatty Acids), Whole Carrots, Whole Sweet Potatoes, Blueberries, Cranberries, Apples, Blackberries, Pomegranate, Spinach, Pumpkin, Barley Grass, Dried Parsley, Garlic, Dried Kelp, Yucca Schidigera Extract, L-Carnitine, L-Lysine, Glucosamine Hydrochloride, Turmeric, Dried Chicory Root, Oil of Rosemary, Beta Carotene, Calcium Carbonate, Dicalcium Phosphate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1),Riboflavin (Vitamin B2),Niacin (Vitamin B3),d-Calcium Pantothenate (Vitamin B5),Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6),Biotin (Vitamin B7),Folic Acid (Vitamin B9),Vitamin B12 Supplement, Calcium Ascorbate (source of Vitamin C),Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Choline Chloride, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate, Salt, Caramel, Potassium Chloride, Dried Yeast (source of Saccharomyces cerevisiae),Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product, Dried Bacillus subtilis fermentation product, Dried Enterococcus faecium fermentation product

***

Hurrah for huskies! If you own a husky, you can probably identify with the video below:

We’d love to hear from husky owners – what food do you feed your pup? Do you notice that your husky reliably prefers some ingredients over others? Let us know about it in the comments below.

venison-dog-food
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Written by

Ben Team

Ben is the senior content editor for K9 of Mine and has spent most of his adult life working as a wildlife educator and animal-care professional. Ben’s had the chance to work with hundreds of different species, but his favorite animals have always been dogs. He currently lives in Atlanta, GA with his spoiled-rotten Rottweiler named J.B. Chances are, she’s currently giving him the eyes and begging to go to the park.

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5 Comments

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Ronald Linville

Nukka, my red husky eats Pedigree high protein. I add one can of fish (tuna, salmon, anchovies), cooked chicken, rice with vegetables or two eggs (cooked or raw) to her dog food everyday.

Reply
Corey

Good job furthering the incidences of dilated cardiomyopathy in all dogs by recklessly pushing grain-free products. Look at actual peer based review articles when it comes to different dog foods. Literally every one of the diets you have recommended are trash. None of these have an AAFCO statement that deviates from all life cycles or maintenance of an adult. Stop creating more health problems in pets, especially things that are preventable. Ask your veterinarian, not some rando online.

Reply
Ben Team

Hey, Corey. I appreciate that you’re trying to help, but I need to correct you on a few things.

1) Two of those foods are grain-inclusive.
2) A correlation between grain-free diets and DCM has been established; causality has not yet been demonstrated. I know that’s a subtle distinction that many miss, but it is important.
3) The term is “peer-reviewed studies,” and I’m happy to read any I may have missed.
4) No, the foods we discuss above are not “literally” trash. Nor are they “figuratively” trash.
5) I don’t understand your issue with the AAFCO statements associated with the diets listed above. “All Life Stages,” covers adults, puppies, and pregnant/lactating adults.

I doubt I’m going to convince you of anything, but I’d encourage our other readers to check out our article about the connection between taurine, grain-free foods, and DCM. While checking it out, look at the big box at the top of the article — the one that says “Vet Approved.”

Thanks for your comments and misplaced condescension!

Reply
Gypsy Wicke

I haven’t found a dry kibble my husky likes at all. Can food he’s not quite as picky but doesn’t like the ones with chicken. He prefers watermelon, Mandarin oranges and strawberries. He’s a big fruit eater!

Reply
Ben Team

Some doggos definitely love fruit, Gypsy! Mine loves just about every (dog-safe) fruit I’ve tried. Blueberries appear to be her favorite.
Just keep searching for a food that works — eventually you’ll find one your husky loves!

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